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Two men sentenced for role in large-scale crystal meth distribution conspiracies

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Posted at 11:11 AM, Jul 20, 2022
and last updated 2022-07-20 11:11:58-04

LEXINGTON, Ky. (LEX 18) — Two men, in separate cases, were sentenced on Monday for their roles in two conspiracies to distribute considerable amounts of crystal meth.

The Lexington Police Department, KSP, and the DEA say they conducted separate narcotic investigations in Lexington throughout 2021. Through these investigations, they arrested 36-year-old Deangelo Grant, of Los Angeles, and 24-year-old William Hargis, of Danville, Kentucky.

Both pled guilty in April 2022 to conspiracy to distribute crystal meth. Hargis also pled guilty to possessing firearms in facilitating drug trafficking and conspiracy to commit money laundering.

Law enforcement officers say they pulled Hargis over during a traffic stop while pursuing a narcotics investigation in May 2021. There, they say they found Hargis with meth, cocaine, marijuana, a digital scale, plastic bags, and cash.

Later, they discovered he operated as a drug supplier out of a Lexington office building. In that building, they recovered more than 50 pounds of meth, four weapons, cocaine, and other drug trafficking items.

Hargis also admitted to crossing Kentucky lines to place bets in Southern Indiana casinos with the money from the drug trafficking.

In a different case in Aug. 2021, Grant flew from California to Lexington to receive a package, which held 48 pounds of crystal meth. Grant intended to distribute the drugs but was discovered by law enforcement after they stopped his vehicle.

Grant was sentenced to 22 years in federal prison. Hargis was sentenced to 35 years in prison.

If released after serving at least 85% of their sentences, both men will remain under the supervision of the U.S. Probation Office: Grant for 10 years and Hargis for five.

Carlton Shier, U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Kentucky, said both cases illustrate a "remarkable" picture of how much illegal meth circulates in Eastern Kentucky.

“Illegal methamphetamine trafficking has an immense impact on our communities, and often brings guns, violence, and other crime," he said. "We remain committed to prosecuting those who engage in this grave conduct, and we hope that sentences like these will serve as a warning to those who continue to engage in it.”