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Voters increased diversity among lawmakers on Election Day by electing openly LGBTQ, Black politicians

Voters increased diversity among lawmakers on Election Day by electing openly LGBTQ, Black politicians
Posted at 12:13 PM, Nov 04, 2020
and last updated 2020-11-04 12:13:29-05

On Tuesday, voters increased diversity among lawmakers by electing LGBTQ politicians openly, and in Missouri, they selected the state's first Black woman to Congress.

In Missouri, voters made history when it elected Cori Bush as the state's first Black woman representing them in Congress.

Bush will represent the state's 1st Congressional District.

Supporters expected Bush's Bush's history-making win after she defeated 10-term incumbent Rep. William Lacy Clay Jr. in the Democratic primary in August, USA Today reported.

Her win ended the Lacy Clay family's political dynasty, representing the heavily Democratic, St. Louis-area 1st District for over 50 years, CNN reported.

There were other "firsts" on Election Day.

Democrat Sarah McBride became the first transgender woman state senator after winning the Delaware state Senate race.

According to the LGBTQ Victory Fund, which seeks to elect members of the LGBTQ community to political office, Democrat Kim Jackson's win in Georgia made her the first openly LGBTQ state senator in the state's history.

According to The Advocate, Democrat Ritchie Torres became the state's first openly gay Black man elected to Congress with his win in New York.

Democrat Jabari Brisport became New York's first Black gay state senator, according to Pink News.

The Associated Press reported that Tennessee elected two openly LGBTQ politicians in state history on Tuesday by selecting Democrat Torrey Harris, a Black Democratic human resources professional who is bisexual, and gay Republican Eddie Mannis.