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Teachers finding creative ways to reach students

Posted at 3:04 PM, Mar 17, 2020
and last updated 2020-03-23 06:38:32-04

LEXINGTON, Ky. (LEX 18) — During this time of uncertainty, some local school teachers are making sure their students know they are loved and cared for by reaching out over the internet. These teachers are creating instructional videos to not only keep their minds stimulated, but also provide some calm in a time when they may be feeling anxious or even scared.

"I’m just more worried about them, their concerns, and I’m not there daily to help them work through those, " said second grade teacher Krista Mullins.

Mullins teaches at Scott County's Creekside Elementary School. She said before her students went home, many were already worried about the coronavirus, so she knew she needed to come up with a way to stay in touch.

"I just started brainstorming what could I do to reach my class," Mullins explained. "Like how could I comfort them during this time where they’re not seeing me every day, and they are worried about their parents."

So, she fired up YouTube, creating a channel for the very first time and started uploading videos.

"On the first day I read a story about a perfect day, and I just said you know what would make your day perfect," Mullins said.

She also has videos of "recess" with her dogs and provides homework for students, and even parents with questions.

"Just that they can still see my face and hopefully still have some encouragement through that," said Mullins.

In Lexington, Northern Elementary School is uploading videos on their Facebook page. They are called KightTime Stories, a play on the school's mascot. Each day a different teacher or employee posts a video reading a book.

"As adults it’s our job to project that calmness and to remain calm. Try to keep things as normal, routine and consistent as possible to reassure them that the adults are here to protect and keep them safe," said Ashley Fischer, the behavior specialist at Northern.

Fischer, a certified school psychologist, said the books are diverse and so are the people reading them. She said some will even be in other languages, so they can continue to focus on the importance of reading and provide a bit of stability in an uncertain time.

"I think naturally we are helpers, and so I think we are all just looking for opportunities to help, " Fischer said.

To follow along with Mullins' lessons visit her YouTube channel.

For daily KnightTime stories follow the Northern Elementary Facebook page.